Author Topic: Anyone know what thread this is  (Read 438 times)

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Offline rd400greenhorn

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Anyone know what thread this is
« on: November 04, 2020, 11:44:54 AM »
Yeah
So the threads on these that hold the handlebar on a rd400

Anyone know what thread these are in metric?
Its just powder painted the threads with primer and Its a bit h..

Offline rd400greenhorn

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Re: Anyone know what thread this is
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2020, 11:52:39 AM »
Forced a thread cutter on there
Low on tools here..

Plain m10 thread.. No fine thread.
Got it :)

Offline Dvsrd

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Re: Anyone know what thread this is
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2020, 12:09:36 PM »
Forced a thread cutter on there
Low on tools here..

Plain m10 thread.. No fine thread.
Got it :)
Ahem. Sure about that? Plain or standard metric coarse M10 has 1.50 pitch.
IIRC, all 10 mm thread on my Yamahas is 1.25 mm pitch, which is sort of a Japanese standard.
Standard (european) M10 fine thread is (or at least used to be) has 1.00 mm pitch.

Offline rd400greenhorn

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Re: Anyone know what thread this is
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2020, 01:55:42 PM »
Well it seemed as my m10 1.0 went on allright, and so does the nut now, so i Will go with that😁😉

Offline Dvsrd

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Re: Anyone know what thread this is
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2020, 02:21:37 PM »
Ok, 1.0 pitch may well be correct in that particular location. 1.50 would really surprise me

Offline teazer

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Re: Anyone know what thread this is
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2020, 03:47:38 PM »
Yes.

It is the thread about threads.... :whistle:

I would expect that thread to be M10 x 1.25

Offline m in sc

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Re: Anyone know what thread this is
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2020, 03:49:28 PM »
everyone ive seen was 10x1.25 but?  whatever works.

Offline Gil Gallad

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Re: Anyone know what thread this is
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2020, 05:50:59 PM »
every m10 thread i've found on suzuki's, yams, even fantic has been m10 x 1.25. then the other day i was messing about with a set of marzocchi fork yokes off a benelli 2c 250. i was going to put them on the reed valve/monoshock build. they have 4 x m10 pinch bolts for the forks and they are definitely m10 x 1.5 threads. blame the italians for that, and they're the only people i know that you have to use a 16mm spanner on some of their nuts and bolts. nobody else i know uses 16mm  ;D
cheers, gil.
p.s. yes, fantic is italian, i know, but they use 1.25 threads  8)

Offline pidjones

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Re: Anyone know what thread this is
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2020, 06:24:40 PM »
every m10 thread i've found on suzuki's, yams, even fantic has been m10 x 1.25. then the other day i was messing about with a set of marzocchi fork yokes off a benelli 2c 250. i was going to put them on the reed valve/monoshock build. they have 4 x m10 pinch bolts for the forks and they are definitely m10 x 1.5 threads. blame the italians for that, and they're the only people i know that you have to use a 16mm spanner on some of their nuts and bolts. nobody else i know uses 16mm  ;D
cheers, gil.
p.s. yes, fantic is italian, i know, but they use 1.25 threads  8)
John Deere garden tractors. 16 mm all over them.
"Love 'em all.... Let GOD sort 'em out!"

Offline Gil Gallad

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Re: Anyone know what thread this is
« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2020, 05:02:45 AM »
i'm not that into tractors tbh, which is why i don't like harleys  ;D
cheers, gil.
p.s. isn't john deere an american company? thought they'd have used af threads/spanners?

Offline Dvsrd

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Re: Anyone know what thread this is
« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2020, 06:25:40 AM »
Threads (and spanner sizes) can be a confusing subject for many. If we only stick to fasteners, and keep pipe thread out of the discussion for now, I'll try to give a quick overview:

Generic standard metric coarse thread: M5x0.8, M6x1, M8x1.25, M10x1.5, M12x1.75 are the most common sizes. Corresponding spanners used to be 8, 10, 13, 17 and 19 mm. Lately, smaller hex has become the norm for some manufacturers, like 16 for M10 and 18 for M12.  I guess to allow more compact assemblies, and save weight.

Japanese vehicle manufacturers mostly use M5x0.8, M6x1, M7x1, M8x1,25, M10x1.25 and M12x1.25. For M10 and M12, the spanner size for bolt heads is often 12 for M8 and 14 for M10. Also, many case/ side cover screws in M6, now have flanged heads with an 8 mm hex. Like Suzuki and Triumph.

As for the John Deere, I suspect the bolts were 7/16" UNC, which happen to have 5/8" hex, that is 15.88 mm.....

Offline pidjones

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Re: Anyone know what thread this is
« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2020, 06:59:54 AM »
Most US manufactured cars, trucks, tractors, etc. designed for both domestic and export use have been metric since early '80's. Our 1980 John Deere 216 is SAE, but the 1995 345 (Kawasaki v-twin engine) is metric. I don't know why Deere chose the odd size bolt heads. Since several required an impact to loosen, it was more time-consuming finding impact sockets than the actual work when I first bought it (used) and pulled the engine to replace the plastic cam gear (preventative work).
"Love 'em all.... Let GOD sort 'em out!"

Offline 85RZwade

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Re: Anyone know what thread this is
« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2020, 08:38:03 AM »
Deere is an American company whose products are manufactured and sold globally, so at some point they switched to metric fasteners. Also, the use of engines such as the above mentioned Kawasaki and Yanmar which are metric made the switch all the more sensible.
Like Gil said, there seem to be national preferences regarding fasteners. Growing up with Japanese bikes it was 10, 12, 14, 17mm all over. Then I started riding KTMs, and they are held together with 10 and 13s. The Deeres I wrench on now are 8, 10, 13, 15, 16 and 18mm, so after 40 years of working on things, I'm finally using my pristine old 16mm sockets and wrenches. Still wearing the 10s out, though.
Rubber side down!